Tuesday, February 13, 2018

"Valentine" - Transcription of Valentine (Val) Winecoff's Last Will and Testament

State of North Carolina
Cabarrus County

I Valentine Winecoff, of the county and state aforesaid being of sound and disposing mind and memory, do make and declare this my last Will and Testament, in the manner and form following, that is to say –

Item 1st. I give and devise to my beloved wife Eliza Winecoff the Plantation on which I now live and with it – the Sheep Pasture which I now use said sheep pasture being in the bounds of the plantation on which my son Ross Davis Winecoff now lives.  (being 184 acres know as the A. C. McRee Home place and the sheep pasture not yet surveyed, joining it.)  I also will and devise to her the Rogers tract of 120 acres.  And with these said lands I will and devise to my said wife Eliza Winecoff all of my personal property to have and to hold the same both Real Estate and Personal Property during her natural life or widowhood.

Item 2nd. I will and devise to my daughter Karen Keziah Walter the plantation on which she now lives containing 103 acres more or less to her and her bodily heirs forever.

Item 3rd. I will and devise to my son Ross Davis Winecoff the remainder of the plantation on which he now lives after the sheep pasture is surveyed off (paid pasture not to exceed 12 acres) to him and his bodily heirs forever.

(There is not an Item 4 in the document.)

Item 5.  I will and devise to my son John Eugene Lee Winecoff as his portion of my estate ($1500) one thousand & five hundred dollars in cash to be paid to him as he needs it.

Item 6.  I will and devise that the Plantation which I have given my son Caleb Mathias Winecoff shall be his entire portion of my estate.  said Plantation joins Wilson Winecoff’s lands and contains (79) seventy nine acres more or less.

Item 7.  I will and devise that the children of Mary Julianna Overcash (being my grandchildren) shall each be paid ($25) twenty five dollars in cash provided they are satisfied with that amount, otherwise they are to receive nothing.

Item 8th.  Upon the death of my wife Eliza Winecoff I will devise and bequeath to my son Warner Jamison Winecoff The Plantation and Sheep Pasture mentioned in Item 1st of this will and (10) Ten acres of Bottom land off the upper end of the Rogers Place making in all about (206) Two hundred & six acres.  I also will and devise that my daughter Lunett (sic) Isabella Winecoff shall have the remainder of the Rogers place being (110) one hundred & ten acres more or less to them and their bodily heirs forever.

Item 9th.  I will and devise to my son Warner Jamison Winecoff the wagons yearing and all the tools in use on the Plantation provided he complys (sic)with the foregoing Items of this will said Plantation being the one on which I know live and two horses or mules his choice.

Item 10.  I also will and devise that after the foregoing clauses are complyed (sic) with that all the live stock and any property not mentioned in this will shall be sold at Public sale and the money be equally divided amongst the children of my said wife Eliza Winecoff and that all surplus monies, if any be divided in the same way.  And lastly I do here by constitute and appoint my son John Eugene Lee Winecoff my lawful executor to all intents and purposes to execute this my last will and Testament according to the true meaning and intent of the same and every part and clause thereof hereby revoking and declaring uterly (sic) void all other Wills and Testaments by me here to fore made.  In witness where of I the said Valentine Winecoff do here unto set my hand and seal this 25th day of March 1885

signed sealed Published  his
Valentine   X Winecoff     Seal
Mark
and declared in the presence of us
by the said V. W. to be his last will and Testament
and we at his request do
subscribe our names as witnesses there to

Harvey (illegible) Rogers

T(?) 6xR(?) C. M. Petree(?)


This post is part of +Amy Johnson Crow's 2018 #52Ancestors challenge.


©Amy Wood Kelly, 2018 - I am happy to share my genealogical research and writing with others, as well as to help others with their research efforts.  However, please do not reprint or repost this in full or in part or use excerpts from it without giving full credit to me, Amy Wood Kelly, as the researcher and author as well as providing the permalink to this post.  Thank you, in advance, for showing respect for my request and the work I put creating this.

Thursday, February 8, 2018

"Favorite Name" - Marie Rosalie Seraphina Toups


I have found so many names in my family tree that I could call "favorites" for a variety of reasons.  For this post, I decided to choose a name that I like based solely on the name itself - Marie Rosalie Seraphina Toups.  She is my maternal third great-grandmother.  I particularly like the Seraphina part of her name, as well as that her given and middle names reflect her maternal French heritage.

My mother and I follow after Andrew Pampas
in the above lineage.

Name Information

  • Marie is a common French variant of the ancient names Mary and Maria. Its meaning is not clearly defined.
  • Rosalie is a French form of Italian and Late Roman name Rosalia.  As one would expect, it means "rose."
  • Seraphina is the feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus and is typically spelled as "Séraphina" in French.  The name is derived from the Hebrew word "שרפים" "(anglicized as "seraphim"), which means "burning ones" and is used to identify the angels surrounding the throne of God in the Bible.
  • Toups was derived from the surname Dubs and came into its current form in the late 1600s to early 1700s.  Rosalie's paternal ancestors who had this surname lived in Switzerland, except for her third great-grandfather who lived in Germany, before emigrating to Louisiana circa 1724.  The Toups were some of Louisiana's earliest settlers, starting with Casper Dubs/Toups originally of Zurich, Switzerland.(1)

Timeline

  • 22 January 1841 - Rosalie, which is the name by which she was called, was born in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana(2), to Drauzin (a.k.a., Drausin) Joseph Toups (Abt. 1812 - Aft. 22 Jun 1880) and Marie Eulalie Stevens (a.k.a., Istiben, Estiben, Estiven, Estievenne, and other variations) Toups (1818 - Aft. 22 Jun 1880).
  • 1 August 1850 - She lived with her parents, two older siblings, and two younger siblings in Grand Couteau, Lafource, Louisiana.(3)
  • 23 July 1859 - Rosalie married Marcelin (a.k.a., Marcellin) Stevens (a.k.a., Stephens, Estievens, and other variations) in Lafourche Parish.(4)
  • 27 July 1860 - The new Mrs. Stevens and her husband lived in Ward 1, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana (Post Office: Thibodaux).(5)
  • 01 June 1870 - Rosalie resided with her husband and their four children in Thibodaux, Lafourche, Louisiana.(6)
  • 22 June 1880 - The U.S. Census shows Rosalie as widowed and living with her six children at Ellician Toups Plantation(7)(8)(9), now known as Ariel Plantation(10), located about "nine miles below Thibodaux," in the 5th Ward of Lafourche Parish, Louisiana.

This post is part of +Amy Johnson Crow's 2018 #52Ancestors challenge.

Bibliography

  1. Deiler, John Hanno. The Settlement of the German Coast of Louisiana and the Creoles of German Descent. vol. 8, American Germanica Press, 1909. pp. 31, 77, 82, 83, 95, 103, 124.
  2. Toups, Neil J. The Toups Clan and How It All Began. Neilson, 1969. p. 98.
  3. "United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCJW-1MC : 12 April 2016), Rosala Toups in household of Dransin Toups, Grand Coteau, Lafourche, Louisiana, United States; citing family 37, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  4. Toups, Neil J. The Toups Clan and How It All Began. Neilson, 1969. p. 98.
  5. "United States Census, 1860", database with images, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MFPD-WLW : 12 December 2017), Rosela Stevens in entry for Marcellin Stevens, 1860.
  6. "United States Census, 1870," database with images, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M87Q-Z2V : 12 April 2016), Rolelia Stephens in household of Marcelin Stephens, Louisiana, United States; citing p. 7, family 47, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,015.
  7. Louisiana Sugar Planters' Association, Lousiana Sugar Chemists' Association, American Cane Growers' Association. The Louisiana Planter and Sugar Manufacturer. vol. 1, Lousiana Planter and Sugar Manufacturer Company, 1888. p. 198.
  8. "United States Census, 1880," database with images, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MD6T-1R9 : 15 August 2017), Rosalie Eliza Esteven, 5th Ward, Lafourche, Louisiana, United States; citing enumeration district ED 131, sheet 641C, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0455; FHL microfilm 1,254,455.
  9. Louisiana Sugar Planters' Association, Lousiana Sugar Chemists' Association, American Cane Growers' Association. The Louisiana Planter and Sugar Manufacturer. vol. 15, Lousiana Planter and Sugar Manufacturer Company, 1895. p. 198.
  10. French, Benjamin Franklin, and Joh Gilmary Shea. Biographical and Historical Memories of Louisiana. Goodspeed Publishing Company, 1892. pp. 424-425.





©Amy Wood Kelly, 2018 - I am happy to share my genealogical research and writing with others, as well as to help others with their research efforts.  However, please do not reprint or repost this in full or in part or use excerpts from it without giving full credit to me, Amy Wood Kelly, as the researcher and author as well as providing the permalink to this post.  Thank you, in advance, for showing respect for my request and the work I put creating this.


Monday, January 22, 2018

"Invite to Dinner" - Family Recipes

For this post based on the "Invite to Dinner" prompt, I'm sharing a few recipes that have been passed along in my family and are perennial favorites.

My paternal grandfather, John "Johnny" Egbert Wood, made this delicious caramel cake
whenever we visited.  It was always one of the highlights of our times together.

This side dish has been a staple at my family's holiday dinners for many years.
(We went through an egg substitute phase, but now we just use a regular egg.)

My mom makes excellent bread dressing, and this is her recipe.  Her father,
Andrew Joseph Pampas, Jr., was from New Orleans and would always add
oysters (before cooking) to the dressing he made.

This casserole has been a family favorite for as long as I can remember.
It's delicious right out of the over or as leftovers.  Mom is more
ambitious than I am with the chicken.  I use chopped rotisserie chicken.

This post is part of +Amy Johnson Crow's 2018 #52Ancestors challenge.



©Amy Wood Kelly, 2018 I am happy to share my genealogical research and writing with others, as well as to help others with their research efforts.  However, please do not reprint or repost this in full or in part or use excerpts from it without giving full credit to me, Amy Wood Kelly, as the researcher and author as well as providing the permalink to this post.  Thank you, in advance, for showing respect for my request and the work I put creating this.

Sunday, January 21, 2018

"In the Census" - Mary Rodrigue and her grandson, Andrew Pampas

Over my years of pursuing genealogy, I've run into some perplexing census records as well as some enlightening ones.  Of course, the most frustrating census records, other than the missing 1890 ones, are those that hide no matter how have one looks.  Since there was quite a pool of census stories from which to choose, I decided to go with one that surprised me when I found it.

On 11 April 1930, John T. Whitehead, Census Enumerator, recorded my maternal grandfather, Andrew Joseph Pampas, Jr., living with his maternal grandmother, "Mary" Rodrigue, at 343 Alix Street in New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana (Part of Ward 15).


Section of the 1930 U.S. Census showing my maternal great-great grandmother and
grandfather living in part of Ward 15, New Orleans City, Orleans, Louisiana.

343 Alix Street, New Orleans as it looked
in March 2017.
(Photo courtesy of Google Maps.)

Map showing 343 Alix Street in relation to the Mississippi River.
It was about 3.5 blocks east of the river.
(Photo courtesy of Google Maps.)

This was an exciting find for me because:

  • It showed a direct link between Agnes Lovincia "Mary" Stevens Rodrigue (1879-1948) and my grandfather (1923-1995).
  • It gave me an exact residence address to research.
The record surprised me, because:
  • My seven year old grandfather was living with his 54 year old grandmother instead of with one or both of his parents.
  • No other family members were listed as residing with them on Alix Street.
As I did further research, I learned that Granddaddy's 1930 residence is part of a neighborhood that has been called "Algiers Point" since the 1970s.  According to my maternal great-grandfather's naturalization paperwork, my grandfather was born in Algiers.  Also, he lived with his parents at the time of his baptism at 311 Homer Street, Algiers, Louisiana, just seven blocks northeast of 343 Alix Street.  So, the residential pieces of his early years fit together nicely.

In 1926, my maternal great-grandmother, Margaret Elenora Rodrigue (1904-1985) divorced my great-grandfather, Andrew Pampas, Sr.  Then, in April 1931, Margaret married her second husband, Edward "Eddie" Paul Hunn (1899-1954).  To date, I cannot locate Margaret in the 1930 U.S. Census.  It seems from these facts that her life was probably a bit tumultuous around April 1930.  Perhaps she thought her mother would provide a more stable home for her son during that time?

In the years surrounding the 1930 U.S. Census, my great-grandfather traveled on ships for work throughout the Caribbean and South America.  With his extended absences, I'm sure he needed help to keep his son's life resembling some sense of normalcy and, thus, decided to let him live with his mother-in-law.  So far, I've also been unable to located Andrew, Sr., in the 1930 U.S. Census.

By 1934, it seems that my grandfather may have been living with his mom and step-father.  I'm basing that on this photo I inherited from my maternal grandmother, Mildred Jane Litaker Pampas (1927-2017):
Margaret Elenora Rodrigue Pampas Hunn, Edward Paul Hunn, and
Andrew Joseph Pampas, Jr. (left to right)
in Biloxi, Mississippi, on 08 July 1934.
As with so many genealogy "finds," questions were answered; and, immediately, more questions arose.  And so the hunt continues!




©Amy Wood Kelly, 2018 - I am happy to share my genealogical research and writing with others, as well as to help others with their research efforts.  However, please do not reprint or repost this post in full or in part or use excerpts from it without giving full credit to me, Amy Wood Kelly, as the researcher and author as well as providing the permalink to this post.  Thank you, in advance, for showing respect for my request and the work I put creating this.
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Monday, January 15, 2018

"Longevity" - The Litaker Sisters

When I think about my family tree and longevity, my maternal great-grandmother, “Nanny,” and her sisters immediately come to mind:

Full Sisters (daughters of George Franklin Litaker, Sr. and Molsie Jane Talbirt(a.k.a., Talbert) Litaker), including Nanny, in birth order:
  • Ola Lenetta Litaker McBride (14 May 1898 – 18 Aug 1991), who died at the age of 93.
  • Faye Elizabeth “Nanny” Litaker Litaker (28 Aug 1901 – 26 Oct 1995), who died at the age of 94.
  • Blanche Lucille Litaker Faggart (22 Aug 1906 – 12 Jul 2007), who died at the age of 100.
  • Mary Elva Litaker Weddington (24 Mar 1911 – 20 Dec 1998), who died at the age of 87.

Half Sisters* (daughters of George Franklin Litaker, Sr. and Carrie White Dove Litaker) in birth order:
  • Margaret Mae Litaker Swarigen (16 May 1891 – 09 Mar 1982), who died at the age of 90.
  • Lacie Carrie Litaker Cox Harris (16 Jul 1896 – 11 Oct 1981), who died at the age of 85.


I grew up around Nanny, Aunt Blanche, and Aunt Mary; and they were all kind, loving, funny, and generous women.  I feel so lucky that I was able to know them.

All of the sisters except Lacie, who move to South Carolina circa 1913, lived their entire lives in Cabarrus County; so they were surrounded throughout their lives with close and extended family and lifelong friends.

I'll share some pictures of the sisters, as well as of a couple of places that were significant in their youth.  I don't have a photo of Mae, so I'm including her husband's obituary, which mentions her, instead.


The Litaker Farm House on South Union Street in what was then
Township #11, Cabarrus County, North Carolina.  This is where the
Litaker sisters grew up.

The Litaker School in Township #11, Cabarrus County,
North Carolina.  It was built by George F. Litaker, Sr.; and it is where his youngest
 four daughters attended primary school.

Aunt Ola and her
daughter, Nancy Elizabeth, circa 1921. 
Nanny with my cousin, Heather, on her left and me on her right.
Concord, Cabarrus, North Carolina. About 1973/1974.
Aunt Blanche - late 1960s/early 1970s.
Aunt Mary (far right) with her daughter,
Marian Young Weddington (far left).
Obituary for Aunt Mae's husband,
Harrison Brack Swaringen.
Aunt Lacie in Lakeland, Florida.
February 1960.




Nanny had one other half-sister, Nellie Gray Litaker Smith (1890-1907), who lived into early adulthood.  Nellie suffered from mental illness, which was prominent throughout her mother's family.  From news reports, it seems she most likely committed suicide.



©Amy Wood Kelly, 2018 - I am happy to share my genealogical research and writing with others, as well as to help others with their research efforts.  However, please do not reprint or repost this post in full or in part or use excerpts from it without giving full credit to me, Amy Wood Kelly, as the researcher and author as well as providing the permalink to this post.  Thank you, in advance, for showing respect for my request and the work I put creating this.
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Sunday, January 7, 2018

"Favorite Photograph" - Molsie Jane Talbirt (Talbert) Litaker

Molsie Jane Talbirt (a.k.a., Talbert) Litaker - circa 1900

Like most genealogists, I can't say that I have one favorite photograph.  However, this one of my maternal second great-grandmother definitely ranks in my top ten.

The main reasons I treasure this particular photograph are:
  • My great-grandmother, Faye Elizabeth Litaker, gave me the original tintype picture in its original frame.  That makes it special to me because it was a gift from her and because she trusted me to preserve a special photo of her mother.
  • This photo is the only existing one of Molsie of which I am currently aware.

About Molsie

Molsie was born on 09 March 1875 in Kershaw County, South Carolina, to Reverend William Thomas Talbirt (1840-1913) and Mary Ann Elizabeth West Talbirt (1843-1927).  She married George Franklin Litaker, Sr. (1868-1939) in Concord, Cabarrus, North Carolina, on 07 July 1897.  George and Molsie had six children of their own, five of whom lived past infancy.  They also raised the three living daughters from George's first married to Carrie White Dove.  Molsie passed away on 19 March 1939 in Concord and is buried in Center United Methodist Cemetery.



©Amy Wood Kelly, 2018 - I am happy to share my genealogical research and writing with others, as well as to help others with their research efforts.  However, please do not reprint this post in full or in part or use excerpts from this post without giving full credit to me, Amy Wood Kelly, as the researcher and author as well as providing the permalink to this post.  Thank you, in advance, for showing respect for my request and the work I put into creating this post.


Friday, January 5, 2018

"Start" - Elizabeth Lee Henderson Wood

The Big Apple, a dance craze from the 1930s, didn’t truly start with my paternal grandmother, Elizabeth “Betty” Lee (Henderson) Wood (1921-2005), whom I called “Nana.”  However, she was instrumental in spreading its popularity nationwide and then worldwide, which led to New York City being nicknamed “The Big Apple” (really!).

The exact origin of the Big Apple dance is not known, though it has similarities to a pre-1860, African-American group dance - the “ring shout” - that was associated religious observances on plantations in South Carolina and Georgia.  Building on the ring shout, the dance that eventually became known as the Big Apple was created in the early 1930s by African-American youth dancing at the a Columbia, South Carolina, juke joint called the Big Apple Club, which is now a historic landmark.  In 1936, several white students from the University of South Carolina started going to this juke joint to watch the black dancers and became fascinated with a particular dance they were doing.

The Big Apple Night Club in Columbia, South Carolina. It was
owned and operated by Mr. H. W. Des Portes, Jr.

Columbia's Big Apple Night Club in Life magazine's 30 Aug. 1937 issue.
The ownership information given is incorrect and was corrected in the next
issue of the magazine.

Swing dancers doing what became known as the Big Apple.
Big Apple marker in Columbia, South Carolina.
Courtesy of Scott Long.

During the summer of 1937, those USC students took the Big Apple dance with them on their summer vacations to the Myrtle Beach.  My paternal grandmother, Betty Henderson, was on her annual family vacation there and first saw the dance at the Myrtle Beach Pavilion.  Six months after that vacation, she won a dance contest performing the Big Apple and earned the nickname "Big Apple Betty."

Myrtle Beach Boardwalk and Pavilion.
Courtesy of Boston Public Library.

News of the dance craze spread to New York; and a well-known New York talent agent traveled to the Carolinas to audition dancers for a show at the Roxy Theatre. At the time, the Roxy was the second largest theater in the world, so it was an amazing opportunity to be chosen to perform there.  Eight couples - one of which included my grandmother - were chosen to dance the Big Apple during a three-week show, starting on 03 September 1937, at Roxy.  They performed six shows a day to sold-out audiences and significantly contributed to starting the spread of the dance's popularity nationwide. After the engagement at the Roxy, the group became known as "Billy Spivey's Big Apple Dancers" and toured the United States for six months.


Marquee of the Roxy Theatre, Broadway, New York City, 1930.
Courtesy of ChairmanZoe's Marvelous Melange.
Betty Wood and her dance partner, Kenneth Clark, dancing
the Big Apple at the Roxy Theatre.
Betty Wood and Kenneth Clark dancing
the Big Apple at the Roxy Theatre.

Following that U.S. tour, the dance’s popularity continued to grow.  By the end of 1937, the Big Apple had become a national dance craze. The 20 December 1937 edition of Life magazine featured the dance in a four-page photo spread.  Arthur Murray, then an entrepreneur dance instructor, incorporated the Big Apple into his swing dance class syllabus, and it ended up being the driving force behind creating the largest chain of dance studios in the world.  Moreover, the initial cut the Judy Garland movie called Everybody Sing (1938) featured the Big Apple, as did the 1939 movie Keep Punching.


In the 1980s and 1990s, my grandmother and Lance Benishek toured the United States and Europe teaching the Big Apple. The tour led to a resurgence of the dance’s popularity among swing dancers.  In 1988, a celebration of the Big Apple dance’s 50th anniversary was held in Columbia, South Carolina, where it all began; and Betty was there for it.  Columbia held a 100th anniversary celebration on 23 July 2017.

Lance Benishek and Betty Wood.
Lance and Nana.

It seemed to bring great joy to Nana to have the opportunity to continuing sharing her lifelong love of dance in her later years.  She found an entire new community and set of friends who shared her passion, respected her knowledge and talent, and embraced her as a person.  I feel sure she never imagined that something she started at the age of 16 would still be so prominent in her life when she passed away at the age of 84 on 02 July 2005.


Nana (second from right) and some of her "Big Apple Girls" friends.

For those of you who may enjoy seeing the dance performed and learning a bit more about its history, here's "Dancing the Big Apple 1937: African Americans Ignite a National Craze."


Sources

  1. Stevens, Erin, and Tamara Stevens, editors. “The Second Era of Swing, and Beyond.” Swing Dancing, ABC-CLIO, 2011, p. 177.
  2. Big Apple Dance.” Historic Columbia, Historiccolumbia.org.
  3. House of Peace Synagogue, Richland County (Hampton & Park Sts., Columbia).” SCDAH, South Carolina Department of Archives and History - National Register Properties in South Carolina.
  4. Hazzard-Gordon, Katrina (1990), Jookin': the rise of social dance formations in African-American culture, Philadelphia: Temple University Press, ISBN 0-87722-956-2.
  5. Miot, J. D. “Pictures to the Editor - Big Apple.” Google Books, Life Magazine, 30 Aug. 1937. p. 100.
    Hutto, J. A. “Letters to the Editors - Big Apple & Police.” Google Books, Life Magazine, 20 Sept. 1937. p. 9.
  6. DeLune, Clair. South Carolina Blues. Arcadia Publishing, 2015. p. 38.
  7. Manning, Frankie; Millman, Cynthia R. (2007), Frankie Manning: Ambassador of Lindy Hop, Philadelphia: Temple University Press, ISBN 1-59213-563-3.
  8. Wilkinson, Jeff (2003-08-24), "'The music would just take you'", The State, archived from the original on 2004-04-30.
  9. Orchardmovies. “Dancing the Big Apple 1937.” YouTube, YouTube Movies, 2 Sept. 2014.
  10. Dancing the Big Apple 1937.” Dancetime Publications, Dancetime Publications.
  11. Big Apple History, archived from the original on 1 November 2007.
  12. Jitterbuzz.com, Interview With Betty Wood.
  13. Arthur Murray.com, History.
  14. Wilkinson, Jeff (2003-08-25), “'You just got in a group and followed along',” The State.
  15. Wilkinson, Jeff (2003-08-26), "'The South Carolina dance was social. It didn't have the flash.'," The State.
  16. Wilkinson, Jeff (2003-08-27), "'It helps identify and define our culture'," The State.
  17. Coveou, M. “My Swing Archives.” The Big Apple, 15 Dec. 2011.
  18. Cyberavenger. “The Big Apple.” Eccentric Shadows, 1 Oct. 2007.
  19. Nelson, Thomas L. 1000 Novelty & Fad Dances: a Guide to How These Are Danced. AuthorHouse, 2009. p. 26.
  20. Pener, Degen. The Swing Book. Little, Brown, 2009.
  21. Bratkovich, Colin. Just Remember This. XLibris LLC, 2014. p. 84.
  22. Salsi, Lynn. “Columbia: History of a Southern Capital.” Google Books, Arcadia Publishing, 1 Aug. 2003. p. 110.


©Amy Wood Kelly, 2018 - I am happy to share my genealogical research and writing with others, as well as to help others with their research efforts.  However, please do not reprint this post in full or in part or use excerpts from this post without giving full credit to me, Amy Wood Kelly, as the researcher and author as well as providing the permalink to this post.  Thank you, in advance, for showing respect for my request and the work I put into creating this post.